Late center English (denoting the sense of smell): indigenous Old French sentir ‘perceive, smell,’ native Latin sentire . The enhancement of -c- (in the 17th century) is unexplained.

You are watching: Is the s or c silent in scent

So the c is silent and also shouldn't really be there.

The 'c' to be probably included because that was the format at the time.

Originally a searching term. The -c- showed up 17c., maybe by affect of ascent, descent, etc., or by influence of science. This to be a propensity in early modern English, likewise in scythe and for a time threatening to make scite and scituate.


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level 2
Op · 4y

Alright, the much more you know, cheers mine man!


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· 4y

Thanks for such a great contribution come the scub.


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level 2
· 4y

I was going to imply the c to be silent since in most instance (unless p adhered to by an additional constanent prefer pneumonia or pterodactyl) the second is commonly silent. It would ha e simply been a guess though.


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level 1
· 4y
I to be going to guess neither! the is fascinating, though.


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level 2
· 4y

I agree. It's most likely regional, however I pronounce "scent" in different ways than "sent".

See more: Is 1/2 Bigger Than 1/4 - Fractions: Comparing And Reducing


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